The Copyright Act of 1957, along with the Copyright Rules in 1958, served as the backbone for intellectual property rights in India, especially concerning literary, dramatic, musical, and artistic works.

Let’s delve deeper into the significance and provisions of the Copyright Rules, 1958.

Title and Application of the 1958 Copyright Regulations

  1. The regulations can be referred to as the “Copyright Rules, 1958.”
  2. These regulations are applicable throughout India.
  3. The regulations will be effective from the date the Act is implemented.

Definition and Clarification

Within these regulations, unless specified differently:

(a) “Act” refers to the Copyright Act, 1957, specifically (14 of 1957).

(aa) “Copyright business” pertains to the activity of providing or issuing licenses related to any category of works protected by copyright or any other rights established by the Act. This also encompasses the functions mentioned in sub-section (3) of section 34.

(b) “Form” denotes a form outlined in the First Schedule.

(c) The term “schedule” refers to the schedule outlined in these rules.

(d) “Section” indicates a specific section within the Act.

Chapter II (in Copyright Rules 1958): Copyright Board Guidlines

Guidelines for the Chairman and Members of the Copyright Board:

  1. The Central Government will appoint the Chairman and members of the Copyright Board for a term not exceeding five years, based on each specific case.
  2. Upon completing their term, the Chairman and members are eligible for another appointment.
  3. The Chairman or any board member can step down by submitting a written notice three months in advance to the Central Government.
  4. The Central Government will decide the salary or honorarium for the Chairman and board members.
  5. Non-official appointees as Chairman or board members are entitled to travel and daily allowances based on the rules for officers of similar status. However, the Central Government can adjust these allowances based on specific circumstances.
  6. Official appointees to the board will receive travel and daily allowances as per their official entitlements.
  7. The Central Government will periodically set other service conditions for the Chairman and board members.

Functions of the Secretary of the Copyright Board

The Registrar of Copyrights is responsible for handling the administrative and secretarial duties of the Copyright Board, and they operate under the guidance and supervision of the Chairman of the Copyright Board.

Chapter III: Relinquishment of Copyright (Provisions)

Describes the process for an author to relinquish copyright rights.

Notice of relinquishment

The author of a work desiring to relinquish under section 21 all or any of the rights comprised in the copyright in the work shall give notice to the Registrar of Copyright in accordance with Form 1.

This means that if an author wishes to give up or renounce any or all of the copyright rights in their work, they must formally notify the Registrar of Copyright using a specified form, which is “Form 1”.

Chapter IV: Licences for Translations (Provisions)

6. Application for licence

  • If someone wants to obtain a license to produce and publish a translation of a literary or dramatic work, they need to submit an application. This application should be made using “Form 11” and provided in three copies. Additionally, the application should be accompanied by the appropriate fee as mentioned in the Second Schedule.
  • Each application should pertain to only one work and its translation into a single language.

7. Notice of application

When an application for a licence is made, the Copyright Board is responsible for publicly announcing it.

This announcement is made in the Official Gazette and can also be made in newspapers.

Each notice must include the following details:

(a) the date of the application;

(b) the name, address and nationality of the applicant;

(c) particulars of the work which is to be translated;

(d) the date and country of the first publication of the work;

(e) the name, address and nationality of the owner of the Copyright as stated in the application;

(f) the language in which the work is to be translated; and

(g) the Registration number of the work in the Register of Copyrights, if any.

In other words, the notice provides detailed information about the application, including details about the applicant, the work in question, and the intended translation.

Consideration of the application (Rule 8)

  1. Timing of Consideration: The Copyright Board will consider the application no earlier than 120 days after the notice’s publication in the Official Gazette.
  2. Opportunity for Hearing: The Board will provide an opportunity for the applicant and, when feasible, anyone claiming an interest in the copyright of the work, to be heard. The Board may also gather any evidence it deems necessary regarding the application.
  3. Multiple Applications: If there are multiple applications for translating the work into the same language pending before the Board at the end of the 120-day period, all these applications will be considered collectively.
  4. Granting of Licence: If the Board determines that a licence for translating the work into the requested language should be grsocitanted to the applicant (or one of the applicants, if there are multiple), it will do so based on which applicant it believes would best serve the public interest.
  5. Conditions of the Licence: Every licence granted will be subject to certain conditions:
    • The timeframe within which the translation must be produced and published.
    • The specific language for the translation.
    • The royalty rate to be paid to the copyright owner for each copy of the translated work sold to the public.
    • Identification of the individual(s) to whom these royalties should be paid.
  6. Notification of Licence Grant: Once a licence is granted, it will be announced in the Official Gazette and in any newspapers where the initial notice was published. A copy of the licence will also be sent to all relevant parties.

This section outlines the procedure the Copyright Board follows when considering applications for translation licences, ensuring transparency and fairness in the process.

9. Manner of Determining Royalties

The Copyright Board is responsible for determining the royalties that must be paid to the copyright owner, as stated in sub-section (4) of section 32. They will consider the following factors in making their decision:

  • The anticipated retail price of a copy of the translated work.
  • The current standards for royalties related to translated works.
  • Any other factors the Copyright Board deems relevant.

10. Extension of the Period of Licence

If a licensee couldn’t produce and publish the translation within the specified timeframe due to valid reasons, they can apply to the Copyright Board for an extension.

Before granting an extension, the Copyright Board will notify the copyright owner (when possible) and assess the reasons provided by the licensee.

11. Cancellation of Licence

The Copyright Board has the authority to cancel a licence on the following grounds:

  • The licensee didn’t produce and publish the translation within the timeframe set in the licence or any extended period granted upon request.
  • The licence was acquired through deceit or by providing false information about a crucial fact.
  • The licensee violated any terms and conditions of the licence.

Before cancelling a licence, the Copyright Board will give the licensee an opportunity to present their case.

Chapter IVA: Compulsory Licence for Publication of Unpublished Works, Translation and Reproduction of Work

11A. Application for Licence: For a licence to publish an unpublished work, translate a work into a different language or reproduce a published work, one must:

  • Submit an application in triplicate using “Form II-A”.
  • Accompany the application with the fee as outlined in the Second Schedule.

11B. Specificity of Application: Each application should pertain to:

  • Only one work.
  • A translation of that work into a single language.

11C. Notice of Application:

  1. Service to Copyright Owner: A copy of the application for a licence should be sent via registered mail to the copyright owner. If the owner is unknown or cannot be located, the application copy should be sent to the publisher whose name appears on the work.
  2. Opportunity for Hearing: The Copyright Board will provide an opportunity for the applicant and, when feasible, anyone claiming an interest in the copyright of the work, to be heard. The Board may also gather any evidence it deems necessary regarding the application.
  3. Multiple Applications: If there are multiple applications for translating the work into the same language, reproducing the work, or publishing an unpublished work pending before the Board, all these applications will be considered collectively.
  4. Granting of Licence: If the Board determines that a licence for translating, reproducing, or publishing the work should be granted to the applicant (or one of the applicants, if there are multiple), it will do so based on which applicant it believes would best serve the public interest.
  5. Conditions of the Licence: Every licence granted will be subject to certain conditions related to the payment of royalties. The licence will specify:
    • The timeframe within which the work must be published.
    • The royalty rate to be paid to the copyright owner for each copy of the work sold to the public.
    • For translated works, the specific language for the translation.
    • Identification of the individual(s) to whom these royalties should be paid.
  6. Notification of Licence Grant: Once a licence is granted, it will be announced in the Official Gazette. A copy of the licence will also be sent to all relevant parties.
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11D. Manner of Determining Royalties:

The Copyright Board will decide the royalties to be paid to the copyright owner based on the following factors:

  • The anticipated retail price of a copy of the work in question.
  • The current standards for royalties related to such works.
  • Any other factors the Copyright Board deems relevant.

11E. Extension of the Period of Licence:

The Copyright Board has the authority to extend the period specified in the license upon application from the licensee, after providing notice to the copyright owner and determining that there were valid reasons preventing the licensee from producing, publishing, translating, reproducing, or publishing the unpublished work within the given timeframe.

11F. Cancellation of Licence:

The Copyright Board has the authority to cancel a licence on the following grounds:

  • The licensee didn’t produce and publish the work within the timeframe set in the licence or any extended period granted upon request.
  • The licence was acquired through deceit or by providing false information about a crucial fact.
  • The licensee violated any terms and conditions of the licence.

Before cancelling a licence, the Copyright Board will give the licensee an opportunity to present their case.

11G. Notice for Termination of Licence:

If a copyright owner wishes to terminate a licence under specific provisions of section 32-B, they must serve a notice to the licensee using “Form II-B” from the First Schedule of these rules.

Chapter  V: Copyright Socities

12. Conditions for Submission of Applications for Registration of Copyright Societies:

  1. Eligibility for Application: Any group of individuals, whether they have formed a legal entity or not, consisting of seven or more copyright owners (referred to as “the applicant”), can apply if they have come together with the intention of managing the business of issuing or granting licences for a specific class of copyrighted works or any other rights provided by the Act.
  2. Application Process:
    • The applicant can submit an application using “Form II-C” to the Registrar of Copyrights. This application is for seeking permission from the Central Government to conduct the said business and to be registered as a copyright society.
    • This application must be signed by all members of the governing body (regardless of its official title) and the chief executive of the applicant group. It’s worth noting that the chief executive doesn’t necessarily have to be a member of the applicant group.

13. Application for Registration by Performing Right Societies: Any performing right society that was operating in line with section 33 just before the Copyright (Amendment) Act, 1994 (38 of 1994) came into effect and wishes to continue its operations as a copyright society under the Act must:

  • Submit an application using “Form II-C” to the Registrar of Copyrights.
  • Ensure that this application is submitted as soon as possible but no later than ten months from the date the said Act started.

14. Conditions for Grant of Permission to Carry on Copyright Business: For an applicant, including a performing right society mentioned in rule 13, to be considered for registration as a copyright society, the following conditions must be met:

  • The foundational document (or “instrument”) of the applicant, such as its memorandum and articles of association, must commit the applicant to deal exclusively with copyright business and activities related to it.
  • The applicant must be willing to adhere to the provisions of the Act and any rules established under it.

Note: In rules 13 and 14A, the term “instrument” specifically refers to the memorandum and articles of association of the applicant.

This section provides guidelines on the registration process for performing right societies and the conditions they must meet to be considered for registration.

14A. Documents Accompanying Applications:

Applications should be accompanied by a copy of the instrument establishing the applicant, consent of individuals to act as members of the governing body, a declaration of objectives, and an undertaking to conform to the Act and rules.

14B. Conditions for Registration of a Copyright Society:

The Central Government may register the applicant as a copyright society if it meets certain criteria. If the applicant lacks professional competence, sufficient funds, or if there’s another well-functioning society for the same class of works, the application may be rejected.

Procedure for Holding Inquiry (Rule 14C):

When the Central Government receives a complaint suggesting that a copyright society is not operating in the best interests of the rights’ owners, it can initiate an inquiry to determine the validity of these concerns. The procedure for this inquiry is as follows:

  1. Notification to the Society: Upon receiving a complaint, the Central Government will share a copy of it with the concerned copyright society. The society is then required to provide a written defense within a specified timeframe and indicate if they wish to present their case orally.
  2. Initiation of Inquiry: If the Central Government, after reviewing the society’s defense, believes there’s a genuine concern, it will commission a formal inquiry. An inquiry officer, holding a position not less than a Deputy Secretary to the Government of India, will be appointed to oversee this process.
  3. Conducting the Inquiry: The appointed inquiry officer will carry out the investigation, ensuring that the principles of natural justice are upheld throughout the process.
  4. Engaging External Assistance: If deemed necessary, the inquiry officer can seek the expertise of a chartered accountant or an audit officer from the Comptroller and Auditor-General of India’s office. The copyright society under investigation is obligated to cooperate fully, providing all necessary documents and information to facilitate the inquiry. The investigation should ideally conclude within three months, but the Central Government can grant extensions if required.
  5. The outcome of the inquiry is determined by the findings of the officer. If the complaints against the copyright society are confirmed or if the society fails to cooperate during the investigation, the Central Government has the power to cancel the society’s registration.

This procedure ensures that copyright societies operate transparently and in the best interests of the rights owners they represent.

14D. Suspension of Registration and Appointment of Administrator:

  • If, during an ongoing inquiry as per sub-section (4) of section 33, the Central Government believes it’s in the best interests of the rights’ owners, it can suspend the registration of the copyright society. This suspension can last up to one year, as specified in the order.
  • During this suspension, an administrator will be appointed to perform the duties of the copyright society.

14E. Powers and Functions of the Administrator:

  1. Transfer of Powers: Upon the appointment of the administrator as per rule 14D and sub-section (5) of section 33, all powers previously held by the copyright society will be transferred to the administrator. All other representative bodies or committees of the copyright society, except the general body, will be dissolved.
  2. Reconstitution of Bodies: The administrator must organise elections to reconstitute the dissolved bodies within six months before the suspension period ends. If the administrator fails to do so, the previously dissolved bodies will be reinstated at the end of the period of suspension for the remainder of their term, excluding the suspension duration.

14F. Cancellation of Registration of a Copyright Society: The Central Government can cancel the registration of a copyright society under the following circumstances:

  • If any details provided in the registration application are later discovered to be false, incorrect, or misleading.
  • After conducting an inquiry and providing the copyright society with a fair chance to present its case, if the Central Government determines that the copyright society is being managed in a way that harms the rights owners, or if it consistently fails to properly manage its affairs, maintain its accounts, or misuse its funds for non-copyright purposes.
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14G. Conditions for Copyright Society to Accept Authorisation & Rights Owner’s Withdrawal:

  1. Acceptance of Authorisation: A copyright society can accept exclusive authorisation from a rights owner or their authorised agent to manage rights in a work. This is contingent upon both parties entering a written agreement. This agreement should detail:
    • The specific rights to be managed.
    • The duration of the authorisation.
    • The agreed fee amount.
    • The frequency of fee payments, in line with the society’s Tariff and Distribution Scheme.
  2. Withdrawal of Authorisation: If a copyright society fails to meet its obligations as outlined in the agreement, the rights owner can withdraw their authorisation. However, they must provide a 60-day prior notice. This withdrawal doesn’t affect the rights owner’s rights under the initial agreement.

14H. Conditions for Copyright Society to Issue Licenses, Collect Fees, and Distribute Fees:

  1. Issuance of Licenses and Fee Collection: A copyright society can issue licenses and collect fees only for works it has been explicitly authorised to manage in writing by the rights owners. This authorisation should specify the duration for which the society can manage these rights.
  2. Distribution of Collected Fees: When distributing the collected fees, the copyright society can deduct up to 15% of the total collection. This deduction covers the administrative expenses the society incurs.

14-I. Registers Maintained by Copyright Society:

Every copyright society is mandated to maintain the following registers at its registered or administrative office:

  1. Register of Owners:
    • This register records details of copyright and other rights owners who have authorised the copyright society to issue or grant licenses on their behalf.
    • It includes the names and addresses of the owners, the type of rights they’ve authorised the society to manage, the publication date of the work, the date the society obtained the right, and the duration of such right.
  2. Register of Agreements:
    • This register contains copies of every agreement the copyright society has made with rights owners.
    • It serves as a record of the contractual relationships between the society and the rights owners.
  3. Register of Fees:
    • This register tracks the fees collected by the copyright society.
    • It details the names of individuals or organisations from whom fees have been collected, the amount collected, and the date of collection.
  4. Disbursement Register:
    • This register records the distribution of fees to each copyright owner.
    • It categorises the disbursements, mentioning the name of the owner, the nature of their copyright, and the date and amount of the disbursement made to them.

14J. Tariff Scheme.-

As soon as may be, but in no case later than three months from the date on which a copyright society has become entitled to commence its copyright business, it shall frame a scheme of tariff to be called the “Tariff Scheme” setting out the nature and quantum of fees or royalities which it proposes to collect in respect of such copyright or other rights administered by it.

14K. Distribution Scheme:

  1. Formation of the Scheme:
    • A copyright society is required to formulate a scheme, termed the “Distribution Scheme,” detailing the procedure for collecting and distributing fees or royalties as specified in the Tariff Scheme. This scheme should be framed as soon as possible, but definitely within three months from the date the copyright society is authorised to start its copyright business.
    • The Distribution Scheme is intended for the benefit of copyright or rights owners whose names are listed in the “Register of Owners” as per clause (i) of rule 14-I. The scheme requires the approval of these rights owners.
  2. Distribution Criteria: The income received by the copyright society for the use of each rights owner’s work or works should determine the distribution of fees or royalties as fairly as possible.

14L. Meeting of Copyright Societies:

  1. Calling the Meeting:
    • Once the Tariff Scheme and the Distribution Scheme are prepared, the copyright society must convene a general meeting of the rights owners listed in the Register of Owners to seek their approval for these schemes.
  2. Notice Period:
    • Rights owners should receive a notice at least twenty-one clear days before the meeting. This notice should also include copies of the proposed Tariff Scheme and Distribution Scheme.
  3. Right to Object:
    • The notice should clearly state that any rights owner who disagrees with the Tariff Scheme or Distribution Scheme can withdraw the authorisation given to the copyright society to manage rights in their work.
  4. Record Keeping:
    • The copyright society is responsible for maintaining a record of rights owners who approve the schemes and those who object to them.
  5. Approval Criteria:
    • The schemes will be considered approved if a majority of the rights owners present at the meeting, in person, give their consent.
  6. Quorum:
    • For the general meeting to proceed, at least one-third of the members must be present.
  7. Amendments:
    • Once the Tariff Scheme or Distribution Scheme has been approved, the copyright society cannot make any changes to them without the consent of the rights owners. This consent must be obtained at a subsequent general meeting specifically convened for this purpose.

14M. Accounts and Audit:

  1. Maintaining Accounts:
    • Every copyright society is required to keep accurate accounts of the fees and royalties collected within a financial year. This includes details of payments made to rights owners, administrative expenses, and other related expenditures. All these financial activities should have the approval of the rights owners.
    • However, there’s a stipulation that a copyright society can only allocate up to 15% of its total collection towards administrative expenses.
  2. Annual Audit: Each copyright society must have its accounts audited annually. This would be conducted by a chartered accountant.

14N. Annual General Meeting of Rights Owners:

  1. Holding the Meeting:
    • Every copyright society must conduct an annual general meeting of rights owners. This meeting should take place within twelve months from the previous meeting held as per sub-rule (1) of rule 14L.
    • Additionally, if deemed necessary, a special meeting of rights owners can also be convened.
  2. Meeting Location and Notice:
    • The rights owners’ meeting should be held in the town or city where the copyright society’s registered or administrative office is located.
    • The notice for the meeting must specify the time, date, and venue address.

14-O. Documents to be Presented at the Annual General Meeting of Rights Owners:

At its annual general meeting, every copyright society is required to present the following documents:

  1. List of Rights Owners: An updated list of rights owners, including their names and addresses, as recorded in the “Register of Owners.” This register is maintained by the copyright society as stipulated in sub-rule (1) of rule 14-I.
  2. Audited Accounts: The society’s accounts for the previous year, which have been audited by a chartered accountant.
  3. Tariff Scheme
  4. Distribution Scheme
  5. Activity Statement: A comprehensive statement, approved by the society’s governing body (regardless of its specific name), that provides a detailed account of all the society’s activities during the previous year.
  6. Budget and Action Plan:
    • Details of the estimated budget for the upcoming year.
    • A proposed program of actions or activities that the society plans to undertake in the succeeding year.

14P. Returns to be Filed by Copyright Societies with the Registrar of Copyrights:

Every copyright society is mandated to file an “annual return” with the Registrar of Copyrights. This return should be submitted within one month following each annual general meeting of rights owners. The return should include the following details:

  1. Meeting Details:
    • The date of the most recent annual meeting of rights owners prior to the filing of the annual return.
    • The number of rights owners who attended the meeting, either in person or by proxy.
    • The minutes of that meeting.
  2. List of Rights Owners: An updated list of rights owners, which includes their names and addresses, as recorded in the “Register of Owners.” This register is maintained by the copyright society as specified in rule 14-I.
  3. Audited Accounts: The society’s accounts for the year, which have been audited by a chartered accountant.
  4. Tariff Scheme
  5. Distribution Scheme
  6. Activity Statement: A comprehensive statement, approved by the society’s governing body or Board of Directors, that provides a detailed account of all the society’s activities during the year concerning the rights of the owners.
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Chapter VI: Registration of Copyright

15. Form of Register of Copyrights:

  1. The Register of Copyrights is divided into six distinct parts, each dedicated to a specific category of work. These parts are:
    • Part I: Literary works, excluding computer programs, tables, and compilations, which also encompasses computer databases and dramatic works.
    • Part II: Musical works.
    • Part III: Artistic works.
    • Part IV: Cinematograph films.
    • Part V: Sound recordings.
    • Part VI: Computer programs, tables, and compilations, including computer databases.
  2. The Register of Copyrights will include details as specified in Form III.

16. Application for Registration of Copyright:

  1. Form Submission:
    • For copyright registration, applications should be made using Form IV.
    • For registering changes in the details of copyright already entered in the Register of Copyright, applications should be made using Form V.
  2. Single Work Application:
    • Each application should pertain to only one work.
    • The application must be submitted in triplicate and should be accompanied by the fee as specified in the Second Schedule.
  3. Notification to Interested Parties: The applicant must notify every individual or entity that claims an interest in the copyright’s subject matter or disputes the applicant’s rights to it.
  4. No Objection Period: If the Registrar of Copyrights doesn’t receive any objections within thirty days of receiving the application and is convinced of the application’s accuracy, the details will be entered into the Register of Copyrights.
  5. If objections are received within the specified thirty-day period, or if the Registrar has doubts about the application’s accuracy, an inquiry may be conducted. Based on the findings, the Registrar will decide on the details to be entered into the Register of Copyrights.
  6. As soon as possible, the Registrar of Copyrights will send a copy of the Register of Copyrights entries to the involved parties, wherever feasible

17. Correction of entries in the Register of Copyrights. —

The Copyright Registrar has the authority to modify or update the Copyright Register as outlined in section 49. This can be done at their own discretion or upon request from an interested party. When making changes, the Registrar will strive to provide the person affected with a chance to present their case and will inform them of any modifications made.

18. Indexes. —

(1) The Copyright Office is required to maintain indexes for each section of the Register of Copyrights, namely:

(i) a general Author Index;

(ii) a general Title Index;

(iii) an Author Index of works in each language; and

(iv) a Title Index of works in each language.

(2) Each index will be organised alphabetically in the form of cards.

19. Inspection of the Register of Copyrights and Indexes:

The Register of Copyrights and its Indexes are open for inspection by any individual. This inspection can be done during reasonable hours and will be subject to conditions and the manner specified by the Registrar of Copyrights.

20. Copies and Extracts of the Register of Copyrights and Indexes:

  1. Any person can obtain copies or make extracts from the Register of Copyrights or its Indexes. However, there’s a fee for this service, as outlined in the Second Schedule. The process is overseen by the Registrar of Copyrights or their designated supervision.
  2. Upon request and after paying the fee specified in the Second Schedule, the Registrar of Copyrights will provide a certified copy of any entries made in the Register of Copyrights and its Indexes.

Chapter VII: Making of Sound Recordings

21. Making of Sound Recordings:

  1. Notice and Payment:
    • Anyone intending to create a sound recording under clause (j) of sub-section (1) of section 52 must notify the copyright owner and the Registrar of Copyrights at least fifteen days before making the recording.
    • Along with the copyright notice, the individual must pay the copyright owner the royalties due for all the intended sound recordings. The royalty rate is determined by the Copyright Board. Additionally, copies of all covers and labels with which the sound recordings will be sold must be provided.
  2. Contents of the Notice: The notice should include the following details:

(a) Specifics of the work for which the sound recording will be made.

(b) Any changes proposed to adapt the work to the sound recording.

(c) The name, address, and nationality of the copyright owner of the work.

(d) Details of any previous sound recordings of the work.

(e) The number of sound recordings planned to be made.

(f) The royalty amount paid to the copyright owner and the method of payment.

Chapter VIII: Importation OF Infringing Copies

22. Importation of infringing copies. —

Applications must be made in accordance with Form VI and must be accompanied by the specified fee as stated in the Second Schedule, as per sub-section (1) of section 53.

23. Procedure for examination of infringing copies. —

The Registrar of Copyrights or the person authorised by them shall collaborate with customs authorities when taking action under subsection (2) of section 53.

Chapter IX: Miscellaneous

24. Mode of making applications, etc. —

Any application, notice, statement, or document required by the Act or these Rules may be sent by hand or pre-paid registered post, unless otherwise instructed by the relevant authority.

25. Mode of communication by the Copyright Board, etc. —

If the Copyright Board, the Copyright Office,, or the Registrar of Copyrights sends a written notice to a person’s known address using pre-paid registered post, it will be considered as properly communicated to that person.

26. Fees:

  1. The fees required under the Act for any matter are specified in the Second Schedule.
  2. Fees can be paid to the Registrar of Copyrights, New Delhi, using various methods:
    • Postal order.
    • Bank draft from a Scheduled Bank as defined in the Reserve Bank of India Act, 1934.
    • Deposit into a Government Treasury, a branch of the Reserve Bank of India, or the State Bank of India under specific account heads.
  3. Postal Orders and Bank Drafts should be crossed and made payable in New Delhi.
  4. Payment by bank drafts will not be considered valid unless the bank commission amount is included in the draft.
  5. If payment is made by depositing in a Government Treasury or specific bank branches, the challan (receipt) proving the payment should be sent to the concerned authority via pre-paid registered post.

27. Right of Audience: In any proceedings before the Copyright Board or the Registrar of Copyrights, any party has the right to appear and be heard. They can represent themselves or be represented by a pleader or another person they’ve authorised.

28. Costs: The costs related to proceedings before the Copyright Board or the Registrar of Copyrights are at the discretion of the respective authority, whether it’s the Copyright Board or the Registrar of Copyrights.

Conclusion

Copyright Rules, 1958, serve as a pivotal guide for the owners of copyright in India, elucidating the intricacies of the applicable copyright law.

These rules not only detail the procedures for the application for registration but also provide clarity on the ownership of copyright.

By doing so, they offer a robust framework to address any infringement of copyright according to the stipulated guidelines.

For owners of copyright, it’s imperative to be well-acquainted with these rules to safeguard their intellectual creations effectively.

Moreover, for those uncertain about the nuances of these rules, seeking advice with respect to their rights and obligations can be invaluable.

Ultimately, the Copyright Rules, 1958, reinforce the commitment to protect the interests of owners of copyright, ensuring that their creative endeavors are recognised and shielded from potential infringements.”

Referrence: https://copyright.gov.in/Documents/CopyrightRules1958.pdf